Wednesday, December 07, 2005

More parody-proof material

Some Megachurches Closing for Christmas

This Christmas, no prayers will be said in several megachurches around the country. Even though the holiday falls this year on a Sunday, when churches normally host thousands for worship, pastors are canceling services, anticipating low attendance on what they call a family day.

Critics within the evangelical community, more accustomed to doing battle with department stores and public schools over keeping religion in Christmas, are stunned by the shutdown.

It is almost unheard of for a Christian church to cancel services on a Sunday, and opponents of the closures are accusing these congregations of bowing to secular culture.

"This is a consumer mentality at work: `Let's not impose the church on people. Let's not make church in any way inconvenient,'" said David Wells, professor of history and systematic theology at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, a leading evangelical school in Hamilton, Mass. "I think what this does is feed into the individualism that is found throughout American culture, where everyone does their own thing."

The churches closing on Christmas plan multiple services in the days leading up to the holiday, including on Christmas Eve. Most normally do not hold Christmas Day services, preferring instead to mark the holiday in the days and night before. However, Sunday worship has been a Christian practice since ancient times.

Happy holidays, reverends.

2 Comments:

Blogger <-<--esoder<---<----<----- said...

Oh I can't wait to hear what Baba O'Liely has to say about this. Will he start a new war against churches attacking Christmas?

Also, isn't midnight Mass on Christmas Eve/Morning generally one of those high attendance services like Easter sunrise service?

2:14 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

a really good comment over at needlenose:

And then there is the way Christmas is 'celebrated' by so many of it's supporters: a few moments of pious reflection in a day that is otherwise set aside for gluttony, envy of others' good fortune, pride in one's own wealth and idiology, rage against those who do not believe as they do, imprudent extravagance of all kinds, sluggardly neglect of the poor and miserable, and greed. How can any moral person respect this mockery of true faith? Is it not damnable?

2:19 AM  

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